Chemotherapy can cause brain damage




Just like they often do in response to the numerous health problems brought about by things like Morgellons Disease and the HPV vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix, doctors commonly deny that the cognitive problems reported by breast cancer patients following chemotherapy are in any way related to the toxic treatment. But a new study published in the journal Archives of Neurology suggests otherwise, as it points to clear evidence of what is known as "chemo brain," or brain damage caused by chemotherapy.

Shelli Kesler from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California evaluated 25 breast cancer patients that had been treated with chemotherapy, 19 breast cancer patients that had surgery, and 18 healthy women, as part of her study. All the women were instructed to solve various problems and complete a variety of tasks. They also filled out questionnaires about their perceived cognitive abilities.


During the process, researchers monitored the women's brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and discovered that those in the chemotherapy group had reduced cognitive ability in three key areas of the brain's prefrontal cortex -- two of the areas were associated with working memory, cognitive control, and monitoring, while the other was associated with executive function, or the area where planning activities take place in the brain.

"This is a huge validation for these women who are telling their doctors 'something is wrong with me'," Kesler is quoted as saying by Reuters Health. "This shows that when a patient reports she is struggling with these types of problems, there's a good chance there has been a brain change."

That any doctor would even deny a potential link between chemotherapy and brain damage in the first place is quite disturbing. Chemotherapy drugs, of course, are widely known to damage both healthy and malignant cells in the body -- and many chemotherapy drugs admittedly cause permanent DNA, heart, and other damage (http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/TreatmentTypes/C)


And the new findings give breast cancer patients yet another valid reason to reconsider going the conventional treatment route. With so many other safe, alternative methods of breast cancer prevention and treatment, why would any woman want to subject herself to potentially permanent brain and other damage caused by chemotherapy? (http://www.naturalnews.com/breast_cancer.html)







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Sunlight prevents cancer


For the same reason that the conventional energy industry has not harnessed the full potential of solar energy (its free!), sunlight and its indispensable byproduct in our skin: vitamin D, represents a serious threat to the medical establishment, whose questionable and aggressive promotion of vaccination and drug-based strategies in place of inexpensive, safe and effective vitamin D supplementation (or better, carefully meted out recreation and sunlight exposure) for immunity, has many questioning their motives.


Vitamin D, after all, has a vital preventive role to play in hundreds of conditions, due to the fact that 1 in every 10 genes in the human body depends on adequate quantities of this gene-regulatory hormone to function optimally. In other words, the very genetic/epigenetic infrastructure of our health would fall apart without adequate levels.

Even the risk for developing cancer, one of the most feared health conditions of our time -- and the one the medical establishment has had the least success preventing and treating -- is intimately connected to your vitamin D status.

Indeed, a groundbreaking new meta-analysis on the sunlight-vitamin D connection, published in the journal Anticancer Research and based on data from over 100 countries, found that "a strong inverse correlations with solar UVB for 15 types of cancer," with weaker, though still significant evidence for the protective role of sunlight in 9 other cancers.


 The relevant cancers were:

"Bladder, breast, cervical, colon, endometrial, esophageal, gastric, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, rectal, renal, and vulvar cancer; and Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Weaker evidence exists for nine other types of cancer: brain, gallbladder, laryngeal, oral/pharyngeal, prostate, and thyroid cancer; leukemia; melanoma; and multiple myeloma."


Sunlight exposure, after all, is essential for health from the moment we are born. Without it, for instance, infants are prone to developing neonatal jaundice. The very variation in human skin color from African, melanin-saturated dark skin, to the relatively melanin de-pigmented, Caucasian lighter-skin, is a byproduct of the offspring of our last common ancestor from Africa (as determined by mitochondrial DNA) migrating towards sunlight-impoverished higher latitudes, which began approximately 60,000 years ago.

 In order to compensate for the lower availability of sunlight, the body rapidly adjusted, essentially requiring the removal of the natural "sunscreen" melanin from the skin, which interferes with vitamin D production. While a life-saving adaptation, the loss of melanin likely has adverse health effects, which include losing the ability to convert sunlight into metabolic energy, increased prevalence of Parkinson's disease (which involves de-melanization of the substantia nigra), and others effects which we will discuss in detail in a future article. 


For now, it is important to point out that within the span of only 60,000 years (a nanosecond in biological time), many of the skin "color" differences among the world's human inhabitants reflect how heavily genetically-conserved was the ability of the human body to produce vitamin D.


It should also be pointed out that vitamin D is to sunlight, what ascorbic acid is to the vitamin C activity in food. In other words, sunlight likely provides a greater spectrum of therapeutic activity (when carefully meted out, preferably during solar noon) than supplemental vitamin D3, which is almost exclusively derived from UVB irradiated sheep's lanolin.

For further research, the following link reveals 50 therapeutic effects of sunlight exposure, as culled from research housed on the National Library of Medicine.

 by Sayer Ji      



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